The latest thinking, news and events from the world of Recruitment

A Third Of Single Job Hunters Are More Upset By Rejections From Potential Employers Than Love Interests

SHARE
,

New research has revealed just how hard it can be to handle rejection for those seeking employment, discovering that a third find it easier to cope with rejection from love interests than potential employers. The research also found that 59% would prefer to find their perfect career, than their perfect partner.

Single job hunters in the UK are more interested in finding the right job than the right partner, according to new research which reveals just how hard they find it to stomach rejection – from employers.

The team at the UK’s leading job search app, https://jobmagnet.com, undertook a survey of 1,200 unemployed Britons in order to understand more about the habits of those searching for employment. All respondents taking part in the poll had been unemployed for at least three months, currently single and were at least 18 years old. There was an even male/female divide.

All respondents were first asked, “What’s most upsetting, rejection from a potential employer or a love interest?” to which a third (34%) stated that they find it hardest to handle rejection from employers. They were then asked, “What would you most like to find, the perfect job or the perfect partner?” to which 59% would prefer to land their dream job than their dream man or woman.

Of those that found employer rejection worst, 54% were female; and it was men who were more keen to find their dream woman rather than their dream job, making up 65% of the respondents who chose the perfect partner over the perfect job.

All respondents were then asked to identify any behaviours as a result of a job rejection, to which 61% had ‘cried’, 57% had ‘drunk alcohol’ and 51% had ‘eaten unhealthy food’. 14% confessed that they had ‘rebounded to an old employer’.

A spokesperson at https://jobmagnet.com commented on the research:

“Finding the right job is a little bit like finding the right partner; it can take a while, you might have to kiss a few frogs along the way and you just have to keep trying.  In all seriousness, it will surprise some people that women make up the majority of those who are most upset by an employer’s rejection, and are more keen to find the perfect job than the perfect partner. Getting rejected always carries a sting, but it’s important not to let it get you down. What’s meant to be will be and you won’t find your happy ending if you give up!”